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Oliver Sacks: June 9, 1933 – August 30, 2015 – Some People Can’t be Replaced

Oliver Sacks mattered much more than most people will ever know. He is not a household name, so here’s some background. Oliver Sacks was born in London and educated at Oxford, California and New York. He was a professor of clinical neurology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and author of numerous books, including Awakenings (1990) […]

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Chess Incarnate Bobby Fischer on the Spectrum

So much has been written in the wake of Bobby Fischer’s death. It’s all covered, the chess brilliance as well as the strangeness of his life. Mr. Fischer was the essence of chess in human form. When someone operates at the genius level, particularly as a child, we are naturally in awe. We want to […]

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American Airlines Finds A Way

Several posts ago I commented on a recent experience traveling United Airlines. It was a mixed bag, as anyone who travels by air these days knows is a generous statement. But I recently had an experience with American Airlines that proves a great customer experience can be delivered regardless of the state of an industry, […]

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Neuro-Typicals Still Struggle to Understand, But Keep Trying

New York Universities’ Child Study Center had a great idea. They were looking for a way to raise awareness of children’s neurological conditions. Certainly a noble idea. The ad agency BBDO worked pro-bono to create a campaign to interrupt consumers and get them to read the ads. Their creative execution was to put the message […]

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Why Should Neuro-Typicals Make All the Rules?

My son is an Aspie. That means he has Asperger’s Syndrome. Probably more frequently known as autism. I attended a day long seminar yesterday entitled Asperger’s Success: All Things Positive, Practical and Possible. It was an incredible experience full of ideas and dialogue, but mostly of hope. Brian R. King is an Aspie and he […]

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